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First appearing in the 1930s, the Ducale fountain pen marked the arrival of haute de gamme writing instruments for Elmo – the original name for Montegrappa. “Ducale” acknowledges the famed Doge’s Palace, or the Palazzo Ducale, one of the symbols of Venice and a masterpiece of Gothic design. Located in Piazza San Marco, between the Piazzetta and the Pier, it embodies the essence of Venetian culture and tradition. Such ideals were incorporated into a pen that exudes sophistication and dignity.

For Montegrappa – based for over a century in its home of Bassano del Grappa and located a mere 80km from Venice – the proximity of this remarkable city and the grandeur of its architecture add to the significance of a pen whose form was inspired by both. A generously-sized writing instrument, demonstrating perfect balance, the Ducale is a joy to hold and a delight with which to write.

Consisting of a rollerball, a ballpoint and a fountain pen, Ducale pens are manufactured from black resin and trimmed with a choice of palladium or rose gold-plated, or in a pearly Emperador Brown resin, offered with rose gold-plated trim. The fountain pen is available with fine, medium or broad nibs, as best suits the writing style of the user. As with all Montegrappa pens, the clip terminates in the signature ball to facilitate easy removal from or insertion into one’s pocket.
Montegrappa, the first Italian manufacturer of writing instruments, opened in Bassano del Grappa in 1912. A century of superb craftsmanship has passed for this Italian brand known around the world for its Italian creativity and style.

In the same historical building since 1912, Montegrappa has been a part of the lives of great men, and it has also witnessed moments of intense creativity and innovative breakthroughs. Ernest Hemingway and John Dos Passos, both Red Cross volunteer ambulance drivers during World War I, crossed the threshold of the original factory entrance on Via Cà Erizzo that was recently restored. That same entrance was among the first in Italy to see the arrival of celluloid, a precious material obtained from cotton that was already a protagonist of Montegrappa collections in the thirties.